Finance: Interest Rates

So from time to time on this blog I do finance pieces. I have been in the finance industry now over 30 years (yikes I am old). This is not financial advice only my financial opinion. You should consider multiple sources when making any financial decision and become as educated as you can. So the subject today is interest rates and how in the U.S. the federal reserve manipulates them to create false narratives in the economy.

Let me be clear here there are several factors in the U.S. economy that contribute to its overall health and well-being. The availability of credit though is a major factor and manipulating interest rates has a dramatic impact on financial outcomes. IMHO one of the biggest travesties in the U.S. economic model is the propensity to promote debt as a means to obtain assets. Of course there are times when you need credit for large purchases you don’t have the capital on hand to cover. Houses, vehicles, machinery that’s traditionally what credit was meant for. Now? You buy your lunch on credit.

The issue then becomes “how much is this purchase costing me?” you see it’s not the 8.99 for the sandwich and soda it’s the interest charge you incur on the purchase when (or if) you don’t pay off your credit card every month. Which, most Americans don’t do. The federal reserve’s rampant meddling with the federal reserve rate (the rate in which banks lend to other banks) has created horrible economic outcomes in the past.

The Fed’s need to relax on rate hikes for at least a quarter.

There is a good article here https://www.forbes.com/advisor/investing/fed-funds-rate-history/ from Forbes that discusses the changes. Essentially what happens is the higher the interest rate the more valuable currency becomes. This is actually a viable method to combat inflation. Inflation often occurs when too much money is in the system or to little supply of products. Post pandemic we have both of these issues which is why the Fed is raising interest rates so much so fast.

Prior to the interest rate hikes over the last 2 years the fed rate was too low. You see the issue really is the U.S. federal government manipulates the value of their currency as a buttress against its monumental debt spending. Now all governments do this to a degree but the U.S. is on a whole other level. We had the prime rate in the U.S. at .5% for years and under 1.0% for a long time. Everyone knew that was way to low but the economy was humming along we had good times so no one complained much.

The problem with that approach is you put off the pain and here we are. Had the fed maintained a more pragmatic approach to interest rates, bringing them back to historic norms incrementally over the last 20 years we would have less inflation now. In the year 2000 the prime rate was 5.75% high by today’s standards but a reasonable rate in my estimation. Why? Because what it does is requires those who use credit to make purchases to think carefully as the interest expense on the debt is high. It’s a big commitment financially to borrow anything at 5% IMHO.

So how do we get out of this manipulation? You can do rate caps but that’s another artificial means to an end. You do what’s called settling the rate market. You get to a point say 4% and you do not raise or lower the rates for 2 full quarters to see how the economy adjusts. The problem now is you have the government changing rates every month. They are doing this to manipulate the economy due to severe inflation. I get why they are doing it but had they not kept interest rates artificially low for nearly a decade the huge increases now wouldn’t be necessary.

I know all of this is fairly dry and not something most of you will probably want to read through. Here is the net bottom line. Leave interest rates alone for 6 months, let things play out see how the economy does. You then adjust .25 -.50 % from there and then wait again. Market adjustments take more than a quarter to take hold and because interest rates were so artificially low for so long it’s going to take well into 23, if not 2024 to flush out the current inflationary situation we have.

Hang in there and remember, your personal economy is paramount. Have a 6-month emergency fund, secure your income sources by diligence at work, and keep an eye on your spending.

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Finance Tip: How to pick great company stocks

First and foremost, let me say that I am not a financial advisor, any finance posts you see on this blog are my own opinion based on decades of being in the finance industry and living my life. Now disclaimer out of the way, there is a method by which you can pick single company stocks that normally beat the indexes. It is another one of those dirty little secrets that a finance professional won’t tell you, but with a little common sense you could figure out on your own.

To be clear, I am talking about stock in one company like Apple, not mutual funds. These come with a much higher risk as your money is tied to the performance of one company exclusively. This method is one that I have employed in the past when helping to set up an investment portfolio for someone in my family circle. It is by no means full proof or for that matter scientific (from a math perspective) at all. It relies on a very subjective business measurement, done by multiple firms.

So what is this method? It is tracking annual lists of “the best places to work”

I know that sounds half assed, simplistic and an uncouth way to make a stock pick. Here’s the thing though, if companies are listed as “best places to work” isn’t the logical conclusion that they must have happy workers? Happy workers usually mean better services and products and that usually means higher sales which equals revenue.

How much is this going to cost me ?

Don’t dismiss this simplistic formula out of hand. Here is a few of the companies that made it on to multiple best places to work for 2021:

  1. Microsoft
  2. Nvidia
  3. In & out burger
  4. Google
  5. Delta Airlines

These aren’t small companies, as a matter of fact most of the are publically traded and provide great dividends. Now this method of stock picking isn’t absolute, companies can fall off the list at any time but the metrics used to evaluate “best places to work” are usually worker centric. That’s the secret sauce here because as I stated, happy workers = good products & services = profits = return on investment.

There is no one catch all best places to work list you should use, there are hundreds of them (if not thousands). What you want to do here is aggregate several (5-10) lists. So if Nvidia appears on 7 out of 10 chances are that’s a great place to work and this investment strat should be employed.

This ties in well to another piece I did about Aristocrat stocks here, combined if you employ both for a mid to long term investment cycle (5-25 years) you should do very well. Remember investments into the stock market are not guaranteed and should be done only after doing research and obtaining a good comfort level.

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stressed-out-woman

Quick Finance Piece: Is this a recession?

Yes, it is.

So before I go too far let me do the normal disclaimer. I am a finance professional and any advice you see on my blog is my own opinion only and is not meant as investment advice. So that out of the way, yes we are in a recession. “But the media says we aren’t in a REAL recession”. I don’t trust the media, if you do I can’t really help you….

An economic recession has been defined for decades as two quarters of economic decline as measured by GDP. Now that’s not the technical definition but that is what has been used as the gauge for many years. The United States is in a recession. Now there are DEGREE’S of recession and that is where the nuance comes in.

This is not a hard recession by any means. We have great job numbers (which is an interesting situation in of itself), but we have horrible inflation, a slowing housing market etc. You see what you aren’t hearing much about is the horrific impact that Covid shut downs had on industries and supply and demand economics. You shut down global production for 6 months, you just don’t flip a switch and it comes back to normal.

The ride shouldn’t be to bumpy this time around

Throw in a war, a decrease in domestic Oil refining, divisive politics, on and on. The situation is dynamic and fluid there is no one catch all correction to fix this. You had decades of artificially low interest rates now creeping up again. A hard recession would see the market decreasing, layoff’s and a higher unemployment rate.

Companies are reporting good earnings that means DEMAND is still there and that bodes well for a quick recovery. They call that a V shaped recovery. I suspect we will see another decline in the 3rd qtr. and possibly into the 4th but the basis for good economic outcomes are there. First, the job market is healthy, you can work and make money. Second, demand for goods and services is still robust, so companies are still making profit (which fuels point 1).

I think 2023 will be a better year economically, unless again something extraordinary happens (a pandemic, another war. Be prudent here and tighten things up as best you can and save a bit more than usual but I don’t suspect things to get horrible soon, but things will still remain in the current state for the near term.

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Yet Another finance secret finance professional won’t tell you (but I will)

So another finance piece, as I write this the U.S. is in an official recession. This piece isn’t about recessions, inflation or politics so you can exhale. We are going to reveal another secret though that finance professionals don’t like to admit. So a quick disclaimer, I am a finance professional. I have been working in the finance and accounting field for over 30 years. This blog is not a finance advice blog; this is my own opinion based on my experiences. Any advice you receive regarding finance should be researched thoroughly by you as an investor and verified through multiple sources.

Now that out of the way here is the opening salvo “When things are good, everyone is a genius.” The last decade up until the pandemic really the stock market overall was pretty good. You had good annualized returns and many people made a lot of money. So being a finance professional and advising people to go into the market wasn’t a genius play. Of course if you aren’t fluent in finance you might have perceived it as such. Interest rates were low for a long time so there really wasn’t anywhere else to go with investing except real estate.

But the secret? Everyone is a genius when things are good, what about when things are bad? What about when you are in a bear market (when indices drop 20% in a calendar year)? The secret is, the real finance geniuses were diversified PRIOR to the bear market. Any finance professional could have told you to put your money in an index fund prior to covid and you would have made fantastic gains. The real economic geniuses advised you to diversify with money spread to commodities, bonds/treasuries, real-estate and precious metals (this is a commodity, but not a traditional commodity).

As an example, what if in 2016 your finance professional advised you to have 15% of your portfolio in “Gas & Oil”? That would look pretty good now wouldn’t it? Same with bonds, treasuries, wheat, gold… you get the picture. The secret here Is diversity of investment result in a wider spread of assets which can absorb declines in any particular sector.

Like it or not, the world still runs on Oil based products.

Now that does mean you would have had less in technologies for the same period and not enjoyed that growth. I concede that, but the savvy investor doesn’t play the short term they play the long term and sustained diversified portfolios over the long haul 10-30 years normally perform as well as a strict stock portfolio. Don’t get me wrong here, I personally believe the majority assets you are investing in should be either growth stock mutual funds or blue chip mutual funds.

100% of a portfolio though?  No, you diversify specifically for bear markets and sharp down turns because they always happen. It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when and how long will it last. For calendar year 22 as of 6.30.22 the markets are down 20.3% now this has come up in July, there is no denying that but you’re still down overall. On top of that we have large inflation numbers devaluing the purchase power of your dollar. So what 1.00 would buy last year now buys .92 that’s an 8% decrease (rough estimate). That isn’t equated well in your portfolios return.

Meaning you made 10% on the stock sale but the money you received purchases 8% less than it did meaning the value of that 10% return to you in real time is a net positive of 2%. Again, the secret here is diversity. Always have part of your portfolio assigned to cash, bonds/treasuries, commodities and that will provide you a decent buffer for the next bear market because this will happen again.

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Another finance secret finance professionals won’t tell you (but I will)

One of the more successful finance posts I have on my blog is a finance secret I shared that industry professionals wont. You can find that post here.

Today I have another secret for you, it’s not a true secret as its not actually hidden but unless you are astute in finance you aren’t necessarily going to catch it. It has to do with mortgages, which in the U.S. right now is a hot finance topic. House prices in the U.S. have risen over the last 3 years anywhere from 8-25% depending on what market you are in.  House prices traditionally do not go down, they level off. If we look at a 100 years of house price data, we can only find 2 years where the median average price drops in comparison to the prior year. Again, this is largely aggregated meaning a market like Manhattan is an extreme, a rural town in Montana might be an extreme as well but on average that is where it stands.

So what is the secret? When you go for a mortgage your ability to borrow money is based on your GROSS income, not your net. It’s a trick banks use to be able to lend you more. So your ability to borrow is based on the amount you earned, not the amount you actually have to spend. The bank/lender does not account for health insurance cost, taxes, child support on and on. The good news is people who would otherwise not qualify for a mortgage can based on their gross income.

Borrowing the max amount, is a foolish move.

The bad news is exactly the same as the good, you can qualify for mortgages you would not have the ability to afford because it was based on your gross income, not your net. So you get situations where people borrow too much, you get terms like “house poor” because most of your income goes to paying your mortgage. The kicker? (well there is two) you pay for the privilege to borrow more than you can afford via interest. The other? You pay for PMI (Private Mortgage Insurance) which essentially protects the lender if you cannot pay the mortgage THEY gave you. You know the one they based on your gross not your net.

No lender is going to tell you it’s too much house, unless its WAY overpriced for your income. You have to be the one who figures this out. You need to estimate the mortgage payment and look at how much you actually TAKE HOME a month. You don’t want your mortgage payment to be more then 25-35% of your take home pay. Additionally, you don’t want a 30-year mortgage if you can absolutely avoid it because the interest alone is a killer. Banks want to lend you money, that’s how they make THEIR money via interest. It’s a tough real-estate market out there you have to be extra careful.

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Historic Inflation – The most important # you need to know is 3.22%

So another finance piece today. I am not going to go through my normal disclaimer hopefully by now you understand you should be diligent about your finances and obtain information from multiple sources. I’m thankful you consider me one, today we are going to talk about inflation. Yes, its real, and it isn’t exclusive to one region we have global inflation. The numbers I will use in this post will be U.S. numbers but in my research it tracks, mostly, globally.

You are probably wondering what the 3.22% is, that is the historic average inflation rate over the last 108 years. That’s ON AVERAGE, which is important. We have years in there where we have 13.5% inflation (1980) so it’s really important to have good perspective here. Historic inflation isn’t as important as “life time” inflation. That metric is the inflation rate in YOUR life time. For me? Its 3.95%. None of the numbers I am throwing at you include 2022 which right now is approx. 8.5% (give or take). As it isn’t a full year of data we can’t use it for these purposes.

Here is a link to the historic chart I am using. So a few important things to remember.

  1. The distinction between historic and life time inflation rates.
  2. The likelihood of sustained inflation.
  3. Globalization

I distinguished the 1st item already, but items 2-3 are intertwined. We had a sustained period of high inflation in the U.S. from 1973 – 1983 (roughly) that’s a long time. That was in my life time, it might be yours too. What normally happens, and is happening now is wages increase as inflation increases but rarely at the same rate. As an example, it’s likely that in 2022 we will come in between 6-10% inflation for the year, it’s unlikely that your income increased by that same amount. The thing that is a killer about sustained inflation is multiple years where your income doesn’t match or exceed inflation = less wealth overall.

Inflation decreases your purchasing power.

You may make more but it doesn’t buy as much, basically. Globalization is a fairly new phenomenon in the inflation equation. In the 70-80’s it was far less then it is now. So what happens in one major country affects the global consumption and production metrics. If China can’t produce as much of X as it normally does, the price of X goes up, or inflates. Add in a pandemic here and there and well you get the picture.

There is only one sure fire way to combat inflation for you personally and that is increase your income by more than the current inflation rate. The problem is most can’t do that. So the second best way to combat inflation is to ensure your income and investments are increasing more than the average inflation rate in your life time. So for me, that means I need to increase my income and investments every year by 3.95%. Now that is just to remain as is, if I want to improve my financial situation (my ability to consume more) I need to increase my return by MORE THAN 3.95%.

Take a look at the link above and see what your life time inflation rate is. This is the minimum target you should be striving for in all of your investments and your income. Trying to figure it out monthly or on an annual is probably not going to work, but hey if you can make 8.5% in these markets I tip my hat to you. For now, shoot for 4% minimum, 6-8% would be ideal and reasonably attainable if you have investments.

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Am I contagious?

Personal Finance – 3 journeymen (not advanced) finance tips

Like every finance piece I do on this blog this is my personal opinion based on 30 years of working in the finance industry. You should research thoroughly any advice you receive before making any financials decisions. The tips in today’s piece are moderate, they aren’t for beginners and those advanced in their financial journey probably have already encountered these concepts.

  1. Reviewing your insurance profile: Regularly you should be reviewing and understanding your insurance profile, likely twice a year. Now insurance is to mitigate disaster/negative situations. This is more than auto insurance or homeowner’s insurance; this should include things like long term disability insurance to replace income. Long term care insurance to mitigate costs of nursing homes or assisted living and umbrella policies that give another layer of coverage for you beyond specific policies (like home owners or auto)
  2. The care of loved ones: This extends to your elderly parents or your children. Do you have a plan for either? What if your parent becomes sick? Who will assist them? This can take on many forms, maybe you have siblings who can help as well. Point is, have a plan here because it’s when you don’t then it presents itself. Kids? Anything can happen here. From the unthinkable of devastating medical injury to helping them pay for college. You should have some plan in place to set aside some money “just in case” hopefully you can help your kid get a head start in life financially, worst case you have to support them for the rest of your life because of a medical issue. Yes, that happens.
  3. Running your finances like a business: This is the hardest one to pull off, but your check book (or whatever you use to ledger your money) is like a Profit and Loss statement for a business. You have to review this regularly, really be clear on how your business is running and call in the executives for meetings regularly on spending and revenue. I know it sounds silly doesn’t it? What this does is, it takes the “personal” out of it and all the stake holders (spouses, kids) become officers of the company who have a vested interest in its success. If you can get to this point on your personal finance journey you are one step closer to expert status, not many people get to this point.
How much is this going to cost?

In the end, a strong personal economy = better outcomes. You can be more generous, you can have things you want, you can afford a good life. When you don’t know where your money is going and you don’t assign a mission to every dollar you place yourself in a weaker position mentally and financially. Anyone can win with money; your income level doesn’t matter you just have to get a handle on where everything is going. This takes maybe an hour a week to do and over time it will take less and less, you can do this.

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3 questions you have to answer before you invest in Crypto Currencies

Yes, today is another finance piece. As with all financial information given on this blog I want to stress that these are my opinions only. You should do as much research as you need to make sure you are educated and comfortable before making any financial decisions. I have been working in finance for nearly 30 years, I have a lot of experience and knowledge but I am one person, and I don’t know you.

Now disclaimer out of the way let’s talk a minute about crypto currencies. Unless you have been living under a rock you know generally what these are. Let’s get the formal definition out of the way first.

  What Is Cryptocurrency?

A cryptocurrency is a digital or virtual currency that is secured by cryptography, which makes it nearly impossible to counterfeit or double-spend. Many cryptocurrencies are decentralized networks based on blockchain technology—a distributed ledger enforced by a disparate network of computers. A defining feature of cryptocurrencies is that they are generally not issued by any central authority, rendering them theoretically immune to government interference or manipulation. Source:

What does that mean in actual application? It means simply that groups of people agree that a virtual currency is worth “X” that group can be you and I, or you, me and your friend Rachel, or the 3 of us and 8 million other people. We can then exchange this currency for goods and services like you would any other currency (like dollars or pesos). It is virtual though, you don’t carry it in your wallet and it is not backed by a government.

Is this guy serious?

That’s how crypto is used, as an investible commodity though should we begin to entertain the notion of investing in crypto’s to diversify our portfolios? The answer is yes, with caveats, three questions need to be answered first.

  1. Are you risk averse? Simply put, does the risk of losing money scare you? Cryptos are a new asset class, unregulated and highly volatile. Yes, you can make a lot of money, you can also lose a lot.
  2. Do you already have a diverse portfolio? Are you just starting to invest, or have you been investing for years with a good spread of mutual funds, cash, other assets?
  3. Do you understand what Crypto is and how it works? Beyond my article have you used it yourself and understand its current application and can logically think about its future application?

These three questions are critical. If you answered yes to question 1, you should not invest in crypto. If you answered no to question 1 move on the question 2. If you answer no to question 2, you should not invest in crypto build up your other asset classes first. If you answer yes to question 2, go to question 3. If you answer no to question 3, do not invest in crypto. If you answer yes, green light go for it.

Summary:

Question 1: Yes Answer = Do not invest in Crypto. No Answer = Move to Question 2

Question 2: Yes Answer = Move to Question 3, No Answer = Do not invest in Crypto.

Question 3: Yes Answer = Go ahead and invest in Crypto. No Answer = Do not invest in crypto.

This is a very simple formula/questions that should provide you with very basic guidance to whether or not you are ready to invest in crypto. Like any financial advice, do as much research as you can and always trust your instincts.

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Finance Lesson: Many of you are going to see this for the first time

What is “this”? It’s called inflation. Many of you have never seen it and don’t really know what it is. You will begin to, if you haven’t already, hear more about inflation. As your Gen X friends will tell you, in the 70’s and early 80’s inflation was high. Mortgage interest rates at 15%+, yes that’s right you know those rates that are 3% or less now? Goods and services, in proportion to income was very expensive. Gallon of gas in 1980? $1.19 a gallon. I know doesn’t seem like much does it?

Not a lot of corollas back then, hybrids? Didn’t exist yet. You had gas guzzlers that were getting horrible gas mileage. Median income for a family in 1980? 21,000.00 Annual. However, the consumer price index from 1977-1980 increased 13.5%. That means, basically (not precisely) that the item you bought in 1977 was 13.5% more expensive just 3 years later. Now this wasn’t everything of course but it was inflation that was out of control.

Enter 2021. Notice the housing market is hot? Have you been to Home Depot to buy some plants or fencing for your yard? Prices are on average 6.5% higher than 2 years ago (for many goods and services not all). Now this is a result of covid, plus people going back to work plus government stimulus. So we have the trifecta of an inflationary period, increased government subsidy (more money in the market) more people working (more money in the market) and industries shut down for extended periods.

Am I contagious?
High amount of money and less goods and services = costs rise.

That in essence is inflation. Inflation is a good monetary solution to one or both problems. Meaning if prices are going up, demand is high (or goods are in shortage) that induces economic activity in those areas. A deep freeze in Florida kills the orange crop, oranges go up in price. Everyone gets 1000 in cash from the government, you are willing to spend more for the oranges now because someone gave you more money to spend. That gives the person producing the oranges more money to reinvest in orange production, increasing the supply and driving the cost down, overtime.

The issue here is time. The simple examples I have given are all in the abstract of time meaning the end game, increased production of oranges as I exampled, could take years. Now if the money supply decreases (the gov stops sending stimulus) you still have to pay the higher price for the oranges. This ushers in the inflationary period. The other lever that mitigates this scenario is increased wages, this is likely to happen as more and more of the world opens up.

In the short term you should expect to pay more for goods and services. It is a sellers’ market so to speak and if you have a skill or service that is in demand (construction, physical labor, lawn care etc.) this is an opportunity for you to make a lot of money. On the flip side, things you want are going to start costing more. That coffee you love every morning? The trucking company delivering to your shoppe is paying more in gas now, it’s likely that cost will transfer to how much your coffee costs.

Inflation is the reality of a good economy going through a natural ebb and flow. It’s not fun when things go up in price, unless you’re the one selling the item and making more money. I believe we are entering into an inflationary period, many of you have never seen it and will wonder what the hell is going on. $3.00 a gallon for gas? Very likely. Remember to keep an eye on your spending and keep an eye on wages for your chosen profession. It’s likely that as costs go up, so will wages but you must be willing to leverage your skill set (and possibly move jobs) to make more to mitigate the costs.

I think we are heading for a good period for workers, things are opening up and there will be good jobs to be had. The down side is inflation is starting to creep in and it’s been so low for so long I don’t think we can escape it this time.

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Do this to ensure your financial success in 2021

2020 is over its time to move on from it and get back on track and become more disciplined. We are in January, and it’s likely that you will have a credit card bills coming in from the holidays. Did you overspend? You aren’t alone if you did, many people who were at home found it easy to shop online and spend. Even if you didn’t overspend below is how you can ensure financial success in 2021.

Step 1: List all your debt’s smallest to largest. (total owed)

Step 2: Next to each debt, if you know it, list the minimum payment for each.

Step 3: Next to each Minimum payment, list the type of debt. (credit card, Auto loan, house payment.

Step 4: next to each debt, if you know it, list the minimum payment for each.

You should now have a matrix of 4 columns, if you did it in Excel even better, paper is fine too. You now have a list of the all the items that are crippling you financially and holding you back from obtaining wealth and freedom. It’s at this point you should take a break from this task. To this point it likely took you from 15-30 minutes to organize but emotionally you might be exhausted.

Now we start on ensuring your financial success in 2021.

Come back to your list when you are ready, but no longer than a week. (you should work on this for at least ½ hour a week, you can do that). Add the column of minimum payments, this is how much you are spending a month on debt. This is IN ADDITION TO your rent, food, utilities, travel. Calculating those are a separate exercise. For now, stick to the total number in column “minimum payment”.

Total DebtMinimum PaymentType of DebtInterest Rate
1$128,000.00($1,500.00)Mortgage4.25%
2$97,000.00$0.00Student loans8.00%
3$17,500.00($585.00)Car Payments5.50%
4$2,500.00($50.00)Discover21.00%
5$800.00($25.00)Master Card17.50%
6$750.00($25.00)Visa18.00%
Total Debt($2,185.00)
Total Fixed($1,815.00)
Grand Total($4,000.00)
Income$4,250.00
Net$250.00
A simple spreadsheet is enough

For my example it is $2185.00. Now add to this your other fixed expenses for the month. Rent, food, utilities all the things you have to have to live, not the things you want. Let’s say that number is $1815, add those two together = $4,000.00 below the 4000.00 put your monthly take home pay.

Your half hour is up, take a break and come back when you are emotionally ready. You now have the blue print to ensure you financial success in 2021. If your monthly take home pay is less than your total expenses your pay has to increase or your expenses have to decrease. You can increase your take home pay by working more, reducing your retirement contributions as an example. Expenses can be reduced by moving to a cheaper apt, less food as an example.

We now start the methodical work of eliminating debt smallest to largest. In my example I have a surplus of $250.00 per month. I am going to take that surplus and ADD IT TO the minimum payment of the smallest debt, my $750.00 visa. In 3 months that card should be paid off. At that point I would then have a surplus of $275.00 a month, which I ADD TO the minimum payment of the next smallest debt the $800 master card which would be $300.00 a month payment. In 3 months that should be paid off.

You rinse repeat for every debt. Eliminating credit cards along the way (you only need one) and revisiting this matrix for ½ hour a week, every week through 2021. You will begin eliminating debt and increasing your net surplus every month. THAT is financial success. You have more money every month to live on, imagine when there is no debt? You have a surplus of 2K plus a month?

Vacations, retirement, new clothes, vehicle upgrades are all on the table at that point. The key to ensuring your financial success in 2021 is becoming debt free ASAP. Then instead of working to send your money to someone else, you get to keep it. ½ hour a week is all it takes. Focus on it, make it a ritual and really invest in your personal economy.

Any questions along the way ask and if I can I will help you.  

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